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Photo Gallery

WE WILL NEVER FORGET.

MSGT. JOHN D ADAMO JR. (1968)

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MSGT. JOHN D ADAMO JR. (1968)
John D Adamo, Jr. was born on April 11, 1925. His home of record is North Arlington, NJ. John graduated from North Arlington High School in 1943, but his sister accepted his diploma for him as he enlisted in the service. He liked football, bowling and playing the drums. John enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps in 1943, and attained the rank of Master Sergeant (MSGT). D Adamo initially served 16 months in the South Pacific with the 1st Marine Air Wing. At the end of WW II, John joined the Marine Reserve. In 1949, he returned to active duty. John saw action in the Korean Conflict in 1953, and aided in the evacuation of the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base during the 1962 Cuban crisis. John married Florence Persis while he was stationed in Oahu, Hawaii. They had four children. D Adamo was listed as missing in action February 10, 1968, but after five days his status was changed to killed in action. He died in aerial flight while serving aboard a Marine aerial refueling transport of Squadron 152 of the 1st Marine Aircraft Wing during operations against the enemy. While delivering a load of JP-4 fuel bladders to the besieged Marine base at Khe Sahn, his aircraft was hit by intense North Vietnamese machine gun fire. Despite the fire, fumes and smoke which rapidly spread through the aircraft, MSGT D Adamo remained in the cockpit and assisted the pilot, enabling the aircraft commander to safely land the transport and allowing several of the crew members to escape before the aircraft burst into flames. D Adamo is buried in Hawaii. He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. His wife never remarried as she said, She had the best husband and he could never be replaced. His love for his children prompted his forming a blood bank to save two brothers with Coole's Anemia. John had planned on retiring in 1968, after 25 years of Marine life so he could spend more time with his family. No one could have been more proud to be a Marine than John. He died being, and doing, what he loved.
Posted by Alan Stinar on December 2, 2010 Full Size|

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